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Boeing issues alert due to 787 engine fire switch failures

Soumis
 
Boeing has issued an alert to airlines using its flagship B787 Dreamliner, warning that the switch used to extinguish an engine fire has failed in a “small number” of instances. The switch also severs the fuel supply and the hydraulic fluid to prevent flames spreading.In its alert to airlines, Boeing warns that long-term heating can cause the fire switch to stick in the locked position so it can’t be used to release the two fire extinguishers in each engine. The FAA has issued an airworthiness… (www.theguardian.com) Plus d'info...

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patstphens1174
Richard Fox 5
They don't make em' like they used to...
BobWysocki
Chinese parts/components cut cost at the same cut safety
patstphens1174
Richard Fox 3
Spot on pal, spot on. There's always been the bloke who'll con ya' out of an honest quid, nowadays there are bloody airworthiness processes and plane makers themselves cutting corners. Corporate greed.
leoaubry
Leo Aubry 0
Dont they inspect these parts,if they do and install. Then you tell me.
waypoint66
David Rice 1
Incoming parts inspection at manufacturing facilities cannot possibly involve 100% inspection down to each every switch on an airliner. Quality inspection in the aircraft manufacturing industry often involves "sampling", and also a reliance upon past vendor performance. Please believe me, as I am an expert on the business processes instituted at manufacturing facilities, including quality inspection of incoming purchased and/or manufactured parts. I do not represent Boeing or any other aircraft or aircraft parts manufacturer at this time.
sgbelverta
sharon bias 3
How much could this switch possibly cost? Is there any quality control left at Boeing?
waypoint66
David Rice 0
The switch in question in part number 010-2310445-70. It's cost $1147.83 according to Boeing's ERP system. The price of the switch is $1521.60 if you purchase it as a spare part and your customer record shows you to be part of the "AL2330" customer segmentation within their customer hierarchy. Yes, Boeing is entitled to make this relatively small profit on the switch. Also, yes, Boeing has a world-class quality control system. Please do a little research on manufacturing quality control before asking such inane questions. Boeing products are among the best aircraft mankind has ever produced, based upon their stellar safety record. Now please go back to be whipped up by the news media, you sheep.
BobWysocki
way to go BOEING you guys seem to failing at every junction ( no pun intended)
waypoint66
David Rice 1
Do you have any idea how many successful flight hours are accrued by Boeing products each and every day? Based upon your flippant comment, you obviously do not. I hope you and your family enjoy a nice holiday together, as at least one of you will likely be getting to your celebration on a Boeing product. Good day, sir!
ianmcdonell
ian mcdonell 1
How does the switch suffer long term heating?
waypoint66
David Rice 1
Aircraft switch panels are complex electronic components. You might be surprised at how much heat is generated simply by resistance (look it up, if you don't believe me). Additionally, aircraft switch panels are often installed in locations with very tight clearance tolerances (a reality of the manufacturing engineering work involved in making design engineer's wishes into actual products). These tight tolerances coupled with electronic resistance can easily make these switches subject to "long-term heating", especially over the expected life-span of a passenger airliner.
jgilz0805
john gilzinger 1
profit-profit-profit-they will be just fine !----profit-profit-profit
waypoint66
David Rice 1
Yes, id10t, corporations are in business to make money for their shareholders. Are you enjoying a booming economy? Of course you are, so shut up and do your job, which hopefully will never be flying passengers anywhere, you socialist jerk.

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