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Aloha Airlines Flight 243 Incident, 32 Years Later

Soumis
 
On April 28, 1988, Aloha Airlines (AQ) flight 243 suffered an explosive decompression, leaving a dead flight attendant and issues related with inspection and maintenance programs. During the explosion, the ceiling of the Boeing 737-200 was torn open, but crew was able to land the damaged jet with 65 passengers and crew on board. However, the flight attendant was never found. (airwaysmag.com) Plus d'info...

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bbabis
bbabis 3
At the time I remember seeing a video of the planes approach and landing. Absolutely mind-boggling when you finally saw a side view of the aircraft as it went by the camera. Great airman-ship and CRM by the crew. As long as you're flying, you're still alive. Do whatever it takes and never stop flying.
Propwash122
Peter Fuller 2
Quote from the AirwaysMag article: “It was later known that just before departure, a damage in the aircraft was reported by a passenger who did not mention it to the crew.” WTF?? So this passenger allegedly reported damage to someone unknown, but not to the crew? AirwaysMag just lets this statement hang in the breeze: they need better writing, better editing, better reporting.

I was in Hawaii about two years after this accident, took two flights on Aloha 732s, remember thinking, well, the FAA and Aloha must be on top of their maintenance problems by now, but just the same gonna keep the seatbelt tight.
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
Not 100% correct.. Was reported to a Flight Attendant and she did not report it to the captain! - I had a similar situation a long time ago on a 727... As a Mechanic, I always look over the plane before boarding and always keep my eyes open before departure. This flight, I noticed a Control Lock flag hanging below the inboard Kruger Flap and I told the FA to tell the captain.. her answer was: "The first officer has already made a walk around and we are good to go! - I quickly pulled out my ID told her I was a company mechanic and to tell the Captain Right now as that is Serious! She did and the FO was doing another walk around as a Mechanic came out to remove the Control Lock. If that lock had NOT been removed and the plane got airborne, I am sure everyone would have died in the crash. There is no way to get the flaps back down in time to create a catastrophic roll that would have been unrecoverable.
solamich
solamich 1
I never was told there was a pin on the 727 leading edge devices and I walked around them many times. Can't find anything in my manual either.
solamich
solamich 1
I did find a flaps up landing procedure in the QRH though.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
Well this one upon retraction would not have moved... you would have 3 leading edge devices retracted and 1 down... you could not have returned them to the down position in time to prevent an uncontrolled roll.
solamich
solamich 1
I suppose. But in all fairness we don't know if the flag blew up into the LE flap and went unnoticed. Pilot exterior preflights don't include absolutely every nut, bolt, actuator, fitting, nook and cranny etc. There is always shared culpability with events like this. Some goes to the mechanic as when the task was completed the pin should have been removed and the logbook signed when the operation was complete.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
The a/c was in the Hangar the night before and when you are doing specific checks and maintenance you put the locks in so that if someone turns on hydraulics the flap does not close on you... I would think that if you are doing a walk around and you missed a Red Flag hanging down 3 feet from anywhere on the a/c that you would have had maintenance to look at it.

I think on the walk around you are supposed to look at the wings, leading edge devices, trailing edge devices for damage or anomalies.... I think you would have caught that one on a walk around... Note the link to the image below... If you did a walk around and you saw one of those hanging down from you wing, you would at least ask questions!

https://www.baatraining.com/what-are-the-remove-before-flight-tags-on-the-aircraft-for/
watkinssusan
mary susan watkins 1
I RMEMBER THIS..A REMRKABLE LANDING OF THAT SEVERLY DAMAGED AIRCRAFT...
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
I remember that one well! It does show how well the 737 is built and how soon we forget.

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