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Icelandair Ferries Boeing 737 MAXs To Spain

Soumis
 
Icelandair’s 737 MAX 8s have taken to the skies again, on a ferry flight bound for Northern Spain. Although it was originally reported by the airline that the aircraft would be moved to Toulouse, it appears the storage location has been changed at the last minute. Two MAX 8s so far have left Iceland. As they are flying low and slow with flaps out, they need to stop off in Shannon (SNN) Ireland for refueling. Only the airline’s five MAX 8s are cleared for flights. Their one MAX 9 is still in… (simpleflying.com) Plus d'info...

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airuphere
airuphere 5
As per article. “They are being ferried low and slow flying at 19000 with flaps out - as this is the only known way to avoid MCAS.” When ACA moved it jets south, they didn’t do this - is this an EASA thing?!
ah6oy
Jim DeTour 2
Figures as part of the deal with whoever the airline dealt with for authorization to fly through their airspace.
raleedy
ALLAN LEEDY 1
Maybe flight with flaps deployed is a strategy for return to passenger service.
williambaker08
william baker 1
Did anyone else notice that there is not flight tracking software. I looked up some of their tales an didnt see any flights.
AbieshanG13
Abieshan Ganeshamurthi 1
Congrats Icelandair. You're MAX 8s finally have freedom, but for Boeing, the groundings are still costing you $14 billion.
ace82nd
Eric Maresh 1
be the Jan 2020 American Airline is going to restart up 737 Max for normal flight status
Quirkyfrog
Robert Cowling 1
IF they are approved, and their pilots want to drive them.
Ricovandijk
Rico van Dijk 1
So a flaps 1 takeoff and leave it there for the whole flight, to prevent a trim runaway that MIGHT occur if the AOA indicators are faulty. What a nonsense. , Anyways not to blame on the flight crew, as I’m sure they were told to do this by very clever people,...
sgbelverta
sharon bias 1
Most carriers moved their 737Max's months ago to warmer weather. These have been sitting in the cold and rain for 7 months. Who knows what other systems might have been affected. And these planes had to fly over a lot of water to get to their temporary home. No airport to land at if a problem arose. This was a prudent decision.
Quirkyfrog
Robert Cowling 1
No airport to land at, but no populated areas with new smoking craters and lots of dead people on the ground. Think of the mess if one had stalled and crashed into a heavily populated area. It would be nasty, and possibly doom the MAX planes.
trickster356
Michael Hoare 0
So it is ok to ferry flight these aircraft but not ok to return to normal flight status?
Quirkyfrog
Robert Cowling -7
Two pilots dying is better than a full plane. Cheaper than disassembly and truck/barge transport.
Quirkyfrog
Robert Cowling -6
I know another use for all these 737 MAX airplanes: Artificial Reefs.

Boeing could strip them, drain them, flush them, and sink them across the planet for fish to live in. It's at least a purpose where they might be able to write them off.
KobeHunte
Kobe Hunte 2
Wow you are a complete idiot.

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